Using CBD for Your Pets

CBD King Kalm for Pets

CBD Oil For Pets, Have You Ever Tried CBD Oil For Dogs?

CBD King Kalm for PetsCBD is a type of organic compound known as a cannabinoid. Cannabinoids are compounds that interact with the endocannabinoid system. This system can be found in both humans and other mammals, including dogs and cats! This means that CBD pet products are widely available for the comfort of your pets and your own peace of mind. The endocannabinoid system plays many roles the bodies of mammals, including the regulation of homeostasis. CBD oil for dogs and cats have become popular on the market and Green Roads World offers King Kalm CBD to care for all of their customer’s loved ones. CBD for pets is formulated specifically with the wellness of canines and felines in mind.
 

Pet CBD Product

Green Roads World pet CBD product utilizes high omega-3 krill and hemp oils. Omega-3s are an important element in the diets companion pets. Essential oils have been shown to have a positive correlation to animal health. Our CBD products for pets come in three concentrations: Regular Strength, Pro Strength and, Extra Strength. These 30ml bottles contain 75mg, 150mg, or 300mg of CBD respectively. Just like humans, animals will respond differently to varying doses of CBD. Customers are urged to make a dosage selection appropriate to the size of their pet. A pet CBD oil could be the perfect solution to your companion needs. Feel free to contact our friendly customer service team if you have any questions remaining.

CBD for our Four-legged friends In many of the ways, our pets are similar to us; they need a good diet, regular exercising, medical care and also companionship for staying healthy. These blends of hemp-derived cannabinoid extracts and MCT oil support calmness and well-being for your pet. Offer your pet these drops when a little extra support is needed. Our pet drops are perfect for thunderstorms, trips to the vet, aging-related challenges, and when other sources of stress emerg

Shop all CBD for Pets here

The Green Roads World Difference:

  • All Products are Pharmacist Formulated!
  • All Products are sourced from hemp grown in the USA!
  • All Products are independently lab-tested for quality assurance and safety!
  • All Products are backed by our customer satisfaction guarantee!

CBD for Pets with Thunderstorm anxiety

 

 

 

 

How is CBD Formulated

How is CBD Formulated

(source Green Road CBD)

CBD, or cannabidiol, is one of 113 cannabinoids unique to the hemp plant. CBD is produced by the leaves and flowers of female hemp plants. Hemp is defined as all cannabis plants with less than 0.3% THC by weight. Because hemp has such low THC levels, it is non-psychoactive by definition. Green Roads Pharmacist Formulated King Kalm CBD

While CBD can be extracted from non-hemp varieties of the plant, hemp-derived CBD is less restricted by the government because of its inherently low levels of THC. CBD from hemp is legal for sale in most US states, while CBD products derived from non-hemp varieties can contain noticeable amounts of THC, and are therefore subject to stricter laws and regulations.

CBD and other cannabinoids are produced by the hemp plant because of their unique aromatic and antioxidant activities, which protect the plant from insects, fungus, bacteria, and changes in the environment.

How to Determine CBD MG sizes

CBD dosing sizes

What is a CBD  MG or milligram? – The amount of the specific cannabinoid called CBD in the hemp oil is measured in milligrams (mg). Strengths, or mg, are in relation to 1 oral application (1 glass dropper full)

Buying Oil: Size and Strengths

CANNABIS DOSING 101

CBD dosing sizesHigh dose? Low dose? CBD? THC? Optimizing one’s therapeutic use of cannabis may entail some experimentation. In essence, the goal is to administer consistent, measurable doses of a CBD-rich cannabis remedy with as much THC as a person is comfortable with.
BY MARTIN A. LEE ON MAY 16, 2018

Cannabis can be effective therapeutically at a wide range of doses. There’s no standard dosage that’s right for everyone. Here are some do’s and don’ts for dosing cannabis:

  • The successful use of cannabis as a medicine depends on managing its psychoactive properties. Many people enjoy the cannabis high; others do not. A person’s sensitivity to THC (“The High Causer”) is key to implementing an effective treatment regimen.
  • One does not need to smoke marijuana or get high to benefit from medical cannabis.
  • CBD is not psychoactive like THC. High doses of CBD-rich formulations are safe, well tolerated, and sometimes necessary.
  • But high doses of CBD are not always more effective than lower doses. As little as 2.5 mg CBD combined with a small amount of THC can have a therapeutic effect.
  • Preclinical studies have shown that full-spectrum CBD-rich cannabis oil (with a small amount of THC) is efficacious at much lower doses and has a much wider therapeutic window than pure, pharmaceutical-grade CBD.
  • Less is more: Cancer patients who received 21 mg/day of Sativex (a cannabis sublingual spray with roughly equal amounts of CBD and THC) experienced significant reductions in pain, more so than cancer patients who received 52 mg of Sativex, while those who were given 83 mg of Sativex reduced their pain no better than a placebo.
  • Cautious titration is recommended when ingesting THC-rich cannabis products (with little CBD). Microdosing as little as 2.5 mg THC can provide symptom relief without making a person feel high. If well tolerated, consider increasing the amount of THC to a total of 15 mg divided equally throughout the day.
  • Cumulative doses of THC exceeding 20-30 mg per day – or a single dose of 10 mg or more – may cause unwanted side effects.
    For cannabis-naïve patients, it may be best to start with low doses of a CBD-rich remedy with little THC and slowly increase the dosage – and, if necessary, the amount of THC – one step at a time. Take a few small doses over the course of the day, rather than one big dose.
  • Figuring out the optimal dose of cannabis may involve some trial and error. A balanced ratio of CBD and THC could have a greater therapeutic impact than either CBD or THC alone. Adjust the amount of CBD and THC until you find the sweet spot with the right combination of both compounds. In essence, the goal is to administer consistent, measurable doses of a CBD-rich cannabis remedy with as much THC as a person is comfortable with.

Are specific CBD:THC ratios better for different conditions?

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Some patterns are beginning to emerge. For anxiety, depression, spasms, psychosis, and seizure disorders, many people report they do well starting with a small dose of a CBD-rich remedy with little THC. For cancer, autism, and many other diseases, some say they benefit more from a balanced ratio of CBD and THC. Extensive clinical trials conducted outside the United States have shown that a 1:1 CBD:THC ratio can be effective for neuropathic pain. Note: The CBD:THC ratio in not an indication of how much CBD or THC is present in a given cannabis product or strain. Some people use cannabis products with different CBD:THC ratios at different times of the day (more CBD for sunlight hours, more THC at night). Almost any cannabis strain or product theoretically could benefit a wide range of autoimmune and inflammatory disorders because THC and other cannabis components activate the CB2 cannabinoid receptor, which regulates immune function.

What is the optimal dosage of CBD?

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An effective dosage can range from as little as a few milligrams of CBD-enriched cannabis oil to a gram or more. Begin with a small dose of high CBD/low THC oil, especially if you have little or no experience with cannabis. Take a few small doses over the course of the day rather than one big dose. Use the same dose and ratio for several days. Observe the effects and if necessary adjust the ratio or amount. Don’t overdo it. Cannabis compounds have biphasic properties, which means that low and high doses of the same substance can produce opposite effects. Small doses of cannabis tend to stimulate; large doses sedate. Too much THC, while not lethal, can amplify anxiety and mood disorders. CBD has no known adverse side effects, but an excessive amount of CBD could be less effective therapeutically than a moderate dose. “Less is more” is often the case with respect to cannabis therapy.

Read more: Cannabis Dosing 101

What should one look for when choosing a CBD-rich product?

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Look for products with clear labels showing the quantity and ratio of CBD and THC per dose, a manufacturing date, and a batch number (for quality control). Select products with quality ingredients: No corn syrup, transfats, GMOs, artificial additives, thinning agents or preservatives. CBD-rich products should be lab tested for consistency and verified as being free of mold, bacteria, pesticides, solvent residues, and other contaminants. Best to avoid products extracted with toxic solvents like BHO, propane, hexane or other hydrocarbons. Opt for products that utilize safer extraction methods such as supercritical CO2 or food-grade ethanol.

Read more: What To Look For In Your Cannabis Medicine

If CBD is so good, won’t pure CBD be even better?

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Single-molecule CBD will inevitably become a federally approved Big Pharma medicine. Products infused with a crystalline CBDisolate, derived and extensively refined from industrial hemp, are already being marketed by unregulated internet storefronts. But single-molecule CBD is less effective therapeutically than whole plant CBD-rich oil extract. Scientific studies have established that synthetic, single-molecule CBD has a very narrow therapeutic window and requires precise, high doses for efficacy, whereas lower dose, whole-plant, CBD-rich treatment regimens are already showing efficacy for many conditions among patients in medical marijuana states. Whether synthesized in a Big Pharma lab or derived from industrial hemp, single-molecule CBD lacks critical secondary cannabinoids and other medicinal compounds found in high-resin cannabis strains. These compounds interact with CBD and THC to enhance their therapeutic benefits. Scientists call this the “entourage effect.” Numerous cannabis compounds have medicinal attributes, but the therapeutic impact of whole plant cannabis is greater than the sum of its parts.

Which States are Legal for CBD

Is CBD Oil Legal?  (source Green Roads World)

see a complete interactive  map

While the popularity and overall acceptance of CBD have skyrocketed in recent years, state laws on CBD vary widely. The most important factors determining CBD legality are whether it is derived from hemp or marijuana and if it is produced by a state-licensed grower.

Even though hemp contains virtually no THC, the answer to the question, “Is hemp oil legal?” is not that simple. CBD derived from hemp is legal in most states. This includes all hemp-derived CBD products like oils, edibles, and ointments. However, marijuana-derived CBD does not enjoy the same privileges as hemp. In some states, CBD derived from marijuana is completely legal; but in most states, its legality depends on a number of different factors and conditions.

Where is CBD Legal?

There are currently nine states where cannabis is completely legal for medicinal and recreational use. If you live in one of these nine states, you can use CBD that comes from hemp or marijuana. These states are Alaska, California, Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Nevada, Oregon, Vermont, and Washington and Alabama.

There are 22 states where cannabis is legal with a doctor’s recommendation. These are Arizona, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and West Virginia.

Fifteen states have limited-access laws that allow cannabis only as CBD oil, with restrictions on the levels of THC varying per jurisdiction. These 15 states are Alabama, Georgia, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Wyoming, and Wisconsin.

As of 2018, there are only four states where all marijuana and marijuana-derived products are illegal. These are Idaho, Kansas, Nebraska, and South Dakota. If you are in one of these states, it is crucial that you know what kind of CBD extract you are using and where it comes from.

As mentioned before, if you are consuming hemp-derived CBD anywhere in the US, you are in good shape. But when it comes to CBD products derived from marijuana, laws vary greatly at the state level. If you are not sure about your state’s cannabis laws, navigate through our map to learn more.

The Future of Hemp: The 2018 Farm Bill

The Agricultural Act of 2014, more commonly known as the 2014 Farm Bill, opened up new doors for the hemp industry by legalizing some cultivation activities that have since allowed the industry to grow in unprecedented ways.

Following the success of various pilot programs made possible by the 2014 act, hemp is now widely accepted by the public and most lawmakers. Earlier this year, the US Senate introduced The Hemp Farming Act in its version of The 2018 Farm Bill. Among other things, the act seeks to make hemp an agricultural commodity, give states the power to oversee hemp production, and take away the Drug Enforcement Administration’s (DEA) authority over hemp.

The 2018 Farm Bill is currently in conference committee where the two legislative chambers must reconcile a few differences before approval. The bill is expected to be signed into law before the end of the year; and if The Hemp Farming Act survives in its current form, it will be the most important victory in the history of the hemp industry in the United States.

Courtesy Disclaimer: 
*The legal landscape around CBD is unclear and changing rapidly both at the Federal and State level. The information on our website and any other communication regarding legality which you may receive from any representative of Green Roads is for informational purposes only and not for the purpose of providing legal advice. You must make your own judgment regarding whether you should purchase CBD in your jurisdiction. You should contact your attorney to obtain more specific guidance.*

Consumer Reports on CBD

What Is CBD? What to Know Now About This Cannabis Product

The FDA has approved the first marijuana drug, and cannabidiol may get easier to buy. Is CBD legal and effective?

A picture of CBD oil. What is CBD oil? Is it legal? Effective?

Cannabidiol, commonly called CBD, holds the promise of relieving a long list of ailments, from pain to epilepsy to multiple sclerosis. While this chemical compound comes from marijuana or its close relative hemp, CBD does not get users high, unlike another compound from the marijuana plant, tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC.

But because the federal government classifies marijuana as an illegal drug and hemp has a complicated legal status, CBD is also highly controversial.

Still, the CBD market is exploding, expected to multiply sevenfold by 2021, to $2.15 billion from roughly $292 million in 2016, according to the Brightfield Group, a market research firm that specializes in cannabis.

Thousands of CBD products—oils, tinctures, vaporization liquids, pills—are now widely available in stores and online. The World Anti-Doping Agencyremoved CBD from its list of banned substances in January, and some athletes now turn to it for pain relief instead of ibuprofen and related drugs.

MORE ON CBD

Researchers from major educational institutions, including Johns Hopkins and the University of California at San Diego, are studying its potential uses. Some are even examining whether CBD might help in treating opioid addiction.

Meanwhile, 47 states, plus Puerto Rico and Washington, D.C., have passed laws allowing the use of CBD, though with certain caveats, according to NORML, the nation’s oldest marijuana advocacy organization. (See our interactive guide, below.)

But there’s debate about the effectiveness of these products, as well as uncertainty about their legality, especially when they come from hemp. As a result, consumers are left to navigate a confusing marketplace with little guidance about whether the products work, are safe, or even contain the ingredients manufacturers claim.

Two recent events highlighted those issues, offering clarity on some—but not all—questions.

Early last week, the Food and Drug Administration for the first time approveda prescription drug made from marijuana, with CBD as its active ingredient. Called Epidiolex, the drug cut seizures by about 40 percent in people with two rare but devastating forms of epilepsy.

The other news relates to the Senate’s passage of the 2018 Farm Bill. Tucked into its 1,000-plus pages is a provision that makes it easier for farmers to legally grow hemp, something long restricted because of the plant’s association with marijuana. It also includes language that could help clarify the uncertain legal status of CBD that comes from hemp.

Cannabis Laws by State
Roll over for details
Recreational & Medical THC + CBDMedical THC + CBDCBD OnlyIllegal
Rules for CBD from hemp may differ.
Source: NORML (the National Organization for Reform of Marijuana Laws). Data reflects regulations for marijuana. The legality of shipping CBD across state lines is ambiguous. This information is for educational purposes and is not legal advice. Updated as of July 3, 2018.

But whether that will translate into making CBD, at least from hemp, legal across the country is still unknown, says Collen Keahey Lanier, executive director of the Hemp Industries Association, a nonprofit trade group.

One reason: The House and the Senate still need to agree on a final version.

And while the hemp provision appears to have broad support, many Democrats and some Republicans object to other portions of the bill, which could jeopardize its passage.

Another reason: The nation’s long, confused history over all things cannabis suggests that even if the Farm Bill becomes law, it could be awhile before the legal dust settles.

So, is there potential for CBD to treat disease and improve health? Yes, just look at Epidiolex, says Donald Abrams, M.D., a cancer specialist and practitioner of integrative medicine at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital, and a co-author of a report on the medical benefits of cannabispublished last year by the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine.

But in many other cases the claims are ahead of the science, Abrams says. And when it comes to products consumers are buying today, “it’s buyer beware.”

Below, we answer some key consumer questions about CBD.

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What Is CBD Anyway?

Cannabidiol comes from one of two related forms of the cannabis plant: marijuana and hemp. The main difference between the two is that marijuana has much more THC than hemp, and often more CBD, too. It’s also harder to extract CBD from hemp than marijuana. But the chemical structure is the same, regardless of the source, say medical and industry experts, so its effect on the body should be the same, too.

Both THC and CBD come mainly from the leaves, resin, or flowering tops of the plants, not the stem. Nearly all products that contain THC also contain CBD. But CBD is often sold and used on its own.

Importantly, hemp oil—found in soaps, cosmetics, and other products—is not the same as CBD oil. Hemp oil comes primarily from seeds of the plant, and the seeds contain only very small amounts of CBD, says Lanier at the Hemp Industries Association.

So hemp oil and other products made from the plant, such as rope and fabric, have no or only trace amounts of both CBD and THC. But hemp cultivation in the U.S. has long been severely restricted by the federal government, making it hard for U.S. companies to make and sell those products. One goal of the new Farm Bill is to loosen those restrictions.

Does CBD Have Health Benefits?

Clearly, CBD can help treat epilepsy, as shown by the recent approval of Epidiolex.

And a growing body of preliminary research suggests that CBD has properties that could translate into better health. For example, CBD seems to be an anti-inflammatory, which in theory could help with arthritis and some forms of pain. And it has many effects on brain chemistry, which could ease anxiety and depression, among others.

One important area: opioid addiction. Some animal studies and early research in humans suggest that CBD may help treat that problem and other forms of substance abuse. And other reports have shown that states with medical marijuana laws have seen drops in the rates of opioid deaths and use, possibly as people turn to cannabis products (which include CBD) as alternatives.

All of that gets researchers excited, says Ryan Vandrey, Ph.D., a Johns Hopkins researcher who is investigating the potential health benefits of CBD, with some promising early findings. But he’s also realistic about the state of the science. “Other than epilepsy, at this point it’s mostly postulation, not proof,” Vandrey says.

And he worries that excessive enthusiasm may be leading people to expect more from CBD than it can deliver. “States are approving CBD to treat conditions based on anecdotal reports and preliminary data,” he says. “I understand that desire, of wanting to help people who think they don’t have any other option. But it may also be false hope.”

Abrams, the cancer specialist who was on the National Academy of Science’s committee on cannabis, agrees. When he and 15 other experts prepared their report, examining more than 10,000 studies in the process, they found only three conditions for which the evidence in humans, not lab animals or other forms of preliminary research, was strong: pain, nausea related to chemotherapy, and spasticity in patients with multiple sclerosis. (The epilepsy studies were published after the NAS report.) And for those conditions, the research wasn’t for CBD in particular but cannabis in general, Abrams says.

For CBD itself, the evidence is even sparser. Abrams says the NAS report could identify only three small published randomized trials—the gold standard for medical research—that looked at just CBD. And for none of those conditions—anxiety, smoking cessation, and Parkinson’s disease—was the evidence strong enough for the NAS report to conclude that CBD clearly helps.

Abrams and Vandrey both blame that lack of definitive evidence not necessarily on the ineffectiveness of cannabis or CBD, but on government rules that for years prevented scientists from using federal money to research the compound’s possible health benefits.

“I’m hoping that now that Epidiolex has been approved, things will open up,” Vandrey says.

And in fact, some restrictions have recently been lifted. Last year, the National Institutes of Health awarded $140 million toward cannabis research, with $15 million going toward CBD studies.

What About the Safety and Dosing of CBD Products?

With so little research into CBD it’s hard to know for certain how safe it is. That may be particularly concerning for women who are pregnant or breastfeeding.

Still, the research to date has identified few risks. And it appears to be safer than THC, with even the FDA saying CBD poses little risk of abuse. Side effects include tiredness, diarrhea, and changes in appetite and weight.

It’s also unclear what doses or forms of CBD might work best for which conditions, notes Joseph Maroon, M.D., a clinical professor of neurological surgery at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center who authored a recent review of the neurological benefits of CBD alone and with THC. He writes that with more than 1,000 CBD and cannabis products on the market, in multiple forms, “dosing recommendations are nearly impossible.” And most medical studies have used doses of CBD much higher than that what’s included in products consumers typically purchase, according to ConsumerLab, a company that tests health and beauty products.

In addition, some research suggests CBD may interact with several kinds of prescription meds.

So if you do want to try CBD, talk with your doctor first, especially if you take any prescription drugs or are pregnant or breastfeeding. And until more evidence comes in, be wary of turning to CBD in lieu of more proven therapies, especially for serious health problems like cancer.

Finally, while it’s unclear what dosage might work best for your health problem, it’s still worth looking for products that specifically say they contain CBD, not just “cannabinoids.” Products that say they contain that broader class of compounds may not have much if any CBD. Instead they’re likely to contain other compounds found in cannabis plants, especially the stem. In addition, look for products that list the amount of CBD per serving, not just per bottle.

Is CBD Legal?

Simple question, not so simple answer.

At the state level, CBD from either marijuana or hemp is clearly legal everywhere other than Idaho, Nebraska, and South Dakota. Every other state, plus Puerto Rico and Washington, D.C, has legalized CBD, either alone (18 jurisdictions) or also with THC (31).

Still, details vary from state to state, with many (at least officially) requiring you to get a doctor’s recommendation. And the health problems that states say CBD (alone or with THC) can be used to treat differ, too. For details, see our map.

From a federal perspective, things are less straightforward, depending on whether the CBD comes from hemp or marijuana.

If the source is marijuana, the feds clearly consider it illegal. That’s because the DEA’s position on marijuana is unambiguous: It classifies anything from the plant, including both THC and CBD, as Schedule I substances, meaning that the agency says they have no known medical use and are addictive—just like ecstasy, heroin, and LSD.

Will the FDA’s approval of Epidiolex prompt the DEA to change its position, at least on the “no medical use” clause? Melvin Patterson, spokesman for the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency, says that’s not certain. Instead, the agency may just reclassify Epidiolex, not all CBD. The agency has 90 days to decide.

The legal questions get more tangled when CBD comes from hemp.

Under its interpretation of the 2014 Farm Bill, the DEA says CBD from hemp is illegal. Unless, that is, the grower raised the plant “under the auspices of a state agricultural pilot program” for research purposes. Or possibly if it comes not from the flower but the stem. Though in that case, if the CBD is an “extracted resin,” it could be illegal again.

Confused? Don’t worry, you’re not the only one.

“As long as there is conflict between federal and state law, there will continue to be confusion over the legal status of CBD,” says Amanda Reiman, Ph.D., a cannabis policy and public health expert based in California who also works for Flow Kana, a cannabis company.

The current Senate version of the Farm Bill tries to unravel the confusion, in part by clarifying that “hemp” means not just the stems of the plant, but seeds, extracts, and all of its cannabinoids—which would include CBD. One important caveat: As in the past, the plant must have THC levels of 0.3 percent or less.

But even if the law does go into effect, it could take time, and possibly lawsuits, to settle the question.

Can You Legally Buy CBD Online?

Both the DEA’s Patterson and Paul Armentano, deputy director of NORML, the marijuana advocacy group, say they know of no cases where consumers faced legal penalties for buying CBD products online.

But they also say that from a federal perspective, online CBD retailers could be at some legal risk, for several reasons. To start with, shipping CBD across state lines could violate federal law.

For another, those products could violate other government rules, particularly from the FDA. For example, products that claim to treat or cure any disease, ranging from migraine to cancer, run afoul of FDA rules saying that such statement can only be made for approved drugs. In other words, Epidiolex can make those claims, but other CBD products cannot.

And CBD products could still be in violation even if they only make more general claims about health, such as the ability to reduce inflammation or improve immune function. While dietary supplements, such as vitamins and minerals, can say such things, the FDA says CBD products aren’t supplements. Why not? Because CBD has been investigated as a drug—and in fact is now approved as one—and therefore can’t be sold as a supplement.

Since 2015, FDA has in fact cracked down on dozens of online CBD retailers, even threatening to seize products, for precisely those reasons.

How Can You Know That CBD Products Contain What They Claim?

It’s not easy, though some states do a better job of testing products than others.

The nine states that have legalized both the recreational and medical use of cannabis do require testing of products before they can be sold. Such testing often includes checking for THC and CBD levels, as well as for mold, pesticides, and other contaminants. Some states with only medical cannabis laws also require some testing.

But among those states, standards vary substantially, with some regulating cannabis products, including CBD-only ones, as if they are pharmaceutical products and others as if they are agricultural ones, says Jennifer Liebreich, at the Association of Public Health Laboratories, which works with states and federal agencies on strengthening laboratory systems and testing programs, including those for cannabis.

Reiman says there may be reasons to be particularly cautious about products ordered online. She notes that there may be less oversight of those products than there is of store-bought ones, making their purity and potency less certain.

Research backs her up. For example, a November 2017 study in JAMA, authored by Vandrey, at Johns Hopkins, found that only 26 of 84 samples of CBD oils, tinctures, and vaporization liquids purchased online contained the amount of CBD claimed on their labels. Eighteen of them had THC levels possibly high enough to result in intoxication or impairment, especially among children. And a quarter had less CBD than advertised. Similarly, FDA testing has found several “CBD” products with no CBD at all.

Consumers need to be “mindful that this is an unregulated industry,” Vandrey says. “So you need to do your due diligence, to make sure what you are buying is what you think it is.”

That may not always be easy, though there are some steps you can take.

For example, look for companies located in states that have legalized the recreational and medical use of cannabis, since they tend to have stricter standards.

Some companies that make CBD products say they also contract with third-party testers to do additional analysis, beyond the state requirements. Kevin Liebrock, chief operating officer at Bluebird Botanicals in Louisville, Colo., says that’s what his company does. And, he says that they post the results online, so customers can check to see that they are “getting the advertised amounts of cannabinoids, like CBD, and that the product is free of contaminants.”

Other companies, such as Floyd’s of Leadville, also post their results online. And Maggie Frank, national educator at CV Sciences, maker of PlusCBD Oil, says customers should ask to see the Certificate of Analysis, or COAs, which show the results of those tests. If a company won’t do that, she says, “that’s a red flag.”

Can I Legally Fly With CBD Products?

Many people do, but that doesn’t mean you can or should, says Armentano, at NORML. That’s because the same concerns about buying it online apply to flying with it. After all, you’re probably crossing state lines.

The U.S. Transportation Safety Administration says that while its agents don’t specifically search for cannabis products, if they find any—including CBD-only ones—they are supposed to refer you to law enforcement.

Even if that doesn’t lead to legal action, it could delay your travel and possibly even hamper future trips through TSA security or jeopardize your ability to qualify for TSA PreCheck.

Reporting by Lisa Gill and Lea Ceasrine.  

CBD Oil Secret Ingredient

Green Roads’ uses a pharmaceutical-grade the highest quality cannabidiol and natural ingredients and rich broad spectrum Cannabidiol oil that is packed with the nutrients from the hemp plant.

  • Phytocannabinoids are the herbal, natural, and classical cannabinoids found in the cannabis / hemp plant.
  • There are over 60 cannabinoids that have been isolated from the plant.
  • Cannabidiol (CBD), Cannabinol (CBN), and Terpenes are the most prevalent.
  • Cannabidiol (CBD) is non psychoactive and contains non-detectable THC. In fact, it has been noted that CBD acts as an antagonist to THC and therefore it negates the psychoactive effects of THC.
  • It is now being understood that the human body does in fact have an Endocannabinoid system, which is why quality CBD has been shown to be an effective form of alternative treatment. The Endocannabinoid system (ECS) is a group of endogenous cannabinoid receptors located in the mammalian brain and throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems, consisting of neuromodulatory lipids and their receptors.
  • CBD specifically interacts with the CB1 and CB2 receptors that send signals to wake up and strengthen the immune system naturally. The boost of the immune system can help the body fight off the bad cells that are weakening it in the first place.

***Due to FDA Regulations, we advise you to research CBD on your own and visit our FACEBOOK PAGE @GREENROADSWORLD to read our customer reviews on the results of our products.***

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